Thursday, July 26, 2018

Aluminum Fencing: The Cleaner, Greener Option for your Fencing Needs

A lot of people are trying to live a greener lifestyle these days, and to leave the smallest carbon footprint possible. For example, people recycle newspapers and bottles, drive electric cars, and use LED light bulbs; but when it comes to home repairs and additions, people sometimes overlook obvious ways to go green.

If you're thinking about installing a fence, and looking to go green, you should choose aluminum fencing instead of wood, vinyl, or other fencing options.

What Makes Aluminum Fencing Green?

Aluminum, as you know, is not a reactive metal. It doesn't oxidize, it's long-lasting, and it can stand up to a lot of different weather. Compare that with chemically-treated wood, which can attract pests, or end up leaching its preservatives into the soil. Even other metals and plastic options lack the durability of aluminum when it comes to fences.

What makes aluminum one of the most attractive options for those concerned with being green, though, is that it is completely recyclable. So even if your fence is damaged, or just wears out, that doesn't mean it goes onto a scrap pile somewhere. Instead, it gets melted down, and recycled into something new. It could be more fencing, it might be soda cans, or it might even be airplane components! Whatever it becomes, that aluminum stays in circulation.

This decreases the amount of overall waste being generated, but it also means there's less need to mine new aluminum for fresh materials. That is not a statement you can make about a lot of other materials people use to build fences with, and its one reason aluminum has remained so popular.

We encourage you to contact us!

Thursday, July 12, 2018

6 Questions to Ask a Fence Contractor

Sometimes, a good fence contractor can be hard to find. If you’re in the process of looking, ask these six important questions before you commit to hiring.

1. How long have you been in business?


Businesses with a bad reputation do not stay in business for long. The length of time a contractor has been working is an indicator of both their reputation and their ability to complete the projects they work on.


2. Are you licensed, certified, and insured?


Most states require contractors to obtain a contractor's license. This means that they understand the requirements for operating as a contractor in your area. Depending on the trade, knowledge exams may be necessary for licensing in some states, but certifications can also prove a contractor knows their trade. Insurance (or a bond) is protection in case the contractor you hire does not complete the work. In other words, your project will get finished; even if the initial contractor bails.


3. Do you have any references?


Have each contractor you talk to give you contact information for two or three satisfied customers. Talk to these customers about their experience, including how well they thought the contractor communicated with them and how well the contractor handled problems as they came up.


4. What is the timeline for completing my project?


Getting a timeline for your project will let you know when a potential contractor is available to start the work, how long it will take, and how busy they are with other projects now. Be sure to ask them how they plan to communicate any changes to the proposed timeline.


5. What should I expect while your crew is on my property?


Answers to this question should include expected noise levels and other disruptions for you and your neighbors, as well as when you might need to be on the property to consult or off the property so a specific type of work can be completed. If you have extra curious or potentially interfering neighbors, you can also ask how they would handle that situation.


6. What steps will you take to protect my property?


Elaborate with questions about how they will prep the site, and their procedures for cleanup. Their answers will tell you if they are on the same page with you as far as how to care for and protect your property while doing the work.


Evaluating their answers…


Some of the information you receive from potential contractors for your fence project is easy to verify. For most states, business and contractor licensing information is available online. Review sites are a good way to get an overall picture of their reputation and work.

Do not stop there, though. Pay attention to how your questions are answered. If a contractor tries to duck a question, or they come across as someone you may have trouble working with, it is okay to pass. Your goal should be to hire a good contractor from a fence company that will work well with you.

We encourage you to contact us with any questions!